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File #: R-28-19    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Resolution Status: Withdrawn
File created: 6/6/2019 In control: City Council
On agenda: 7/22/2019 Final action: 7/22/2019
Title: Larkin Street Commemoration - For the purpose of commemorating Larkin Street; allocating funds for a commemorative sign; and generally related to commemorating Larkin Street.
Sponsors: Elly Tierney, Gavin Buckley, Rob Savidge, Marc Rodriguez, Rhonda Pindell Charles
Indexes: Heritage Commission
Attachments: 1. R-28-19 Larkin Street Commemoration First Reader.pdf, 2. R-28-19 Amendment 1 Tierney.pdf
Title
Larkin Street Commemoration - For the purpose of commemorating Larkin Street; allocating funds for a commemorative sign; and generally related to commemorating Larkin Street.
Body
CITY COUNCIL OF THE
City of Annapolis

Resolution 28-19

Introduced by: Alderwoman Tierney, Mayor Buckley, Alderman Savidge,
Alderman Rodriguez, Alderwoman Pindell Charles

A RESOLUTION concerning

Larkin Street Commemoration

FOR the purpose of commemorating Larkin Street; allocating funds for a commemorative sign; and generally related to commemorating Larkin Street.


WHEREAS, in Annapolis during the 1950s, due to an increase in federally funded grants, public housing construction and development propagated and there was a sense of hope and increased financial opportunity that ushered in an awakening within the African-American community; and

WHEREAS, the African-American community flourished through a network of fraternities, sororities, the Legionnaires, the Elks, the Masons, and other social and professional organizations, many of which were located in the "Old Fourth Ward", also known as the "Annapolis Harlem" at the time; and

WHEREAS, by the 1960s, the African-American population in Annapolis had grown exponentially, but because they were socioeconomically underserved, local representatives had to advocate for improved education and increased housing for their citizens; and

WHEREAS, through years of federally funded urban redevelopment, African-American residents were displaced from their community in the Old Fourth Ward and moved to public housing on the outskirts of the City limits, where there was no public transportation to get to jobs downtown; and

WHEREAS, of particular note, African-American families were displaced from their homes on Larkin Street to make way for redevelopment on what is now known as City Gate Lane for the purpose of eliminating substandard housing at Gott's Court, Washington and Clay Streets, and to erect a parking garage for the Anne Ar...

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